Our Farms

From hog breed specialists to large-scale farms, America’s pig farms include a variety of farm sizes and types.

60,000+ pig farms in the U.S.

Types of U.S. Pig Farms

Today, there are more than 60,000 pig farms in the United States.2 They include a variety of farm sizes and types, and they raise pork to meet a wide variety of consumer demands.3 There are different approaches to raising pigs, including: small-scale farms, large-scale farms and those whose pig raising practices serve niche markets, such as consumers who want pork raised with outdoor access or heirloom breeds (such as Berkshire pork).

Types of Pig Farms

In addition to more consumer choice, greater efficiencies and growth in productivity among America’s pig farms have resulted in a more abundant, affordable pork supply in the United States and abroad.

No matter the size or type of pig farm, the basic tenets of animal agriculture remain the same: Good animal care, stewardship of the land, production of safe, wholesome food and care for employees and communities.

Farrow-to-finish

Farms manage all stages of pig growth and development, from breeding through finishing, to market weight of about 285 pounds.

Farrow-to-nursery

Farms specialize in the breeding of sows and raising of 40- to 50-pound feeder pigs, which are then sold to farms that specialize in feeding pigs until they reach market weight.

Farrow-to-wean

Farms oversee breeding herds and raise pigs until they are weaned at approximately 10 to 15 pounds, at which time they are sold to wean-to-finish farms.

Wean-to-finish

Farms purchase weaned pigs from farrow-to-wean farms and grow them until they reach market weights.

Finishing

Farms buy 40 to 50-pound feeder pigs from farrow-to-nursery farms and raise them until they reach market weight.

Where are U.S. Pig Farms Located?

All 50 states have pig farms, although some states have more farms than others. The 10 states with the most pigs are4:

How America’s Pig Farmers Embrace We Care

America’s pig farmers’ commitment to sustainability and continuous improvement is stronger than ever. In our mission to produce safe, nutritious food in a responsible and sustainable manner, we are guided by six ethical principles embodied in our We Care commitment: Food Safety, Animal Well-being, Environment, Public Health, Our People and Community.

Here are stories of responsible, ethical and sustainable pig farming:

Thomas Titus

Tri Pork, Inc.
Elkhart, Illinois

Joe Dykhuis

Dykhuis Farms
Hamilton, Michigan

Brandi Guerrero

Smithfield Foods
Milford, Utah

Orlando Lopez

Smithfield Foods
Milford, Utah

James Lamb

Prestage Farms
Clinton, North Carolina

Carissa Odland, DVM

Veterinarian and Researcher
Pipestone, Minnesota

Raul Romero

Iowa Select Farms
Osceola, Iowa

Pete Dull

Dull Homestead, Inc.
Brookville, Ohio


1 U.S. Department of Agriculture. America’s Diverse Family Farms, 2018 Edition. December 2018. https://www.ers.usda.gov/webdocs/publications/90985/eib-203.pdf?v=9520.4

2 ”Pork Facts.” National Pork Producers Council. http://nppc.org/pork-facts/.

3USDA, Hogs and Pigs Report (December 1977-2002); Livestock Operations (April 2004); and Secretary Vilsack Announces National Pork Board Appointments (2014).

4 National Pork Board.