5 Ways Subway Got it Wrong

When Subway recently announced — that soon all meat served in its restaurants would be sourced from farms that use no antibiotics at any time — some folks cheered. But, the thing is, all meat sold in the U.S. is inspected by USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service for consumer safety and must meet the same high standards regardless of production methods. Furthermore, it’s not practical to never use antibiotics on a farm. Here’s how Subway got it wrong:

1. To pig farmers, food safety trumps everything.
1. To pig farmers, food safety trumps everything.

 

2. Farmers care tremendously for their animals. They want them healthy, and thriving. Sometimes that means treating a sick pig with an FDA-approved and veterinarian-recommended antibiotic.
2. Farmers care tremendously for their animals. They want them healthy, and thriving. Sometimes that means treating a sick pig with an FDA-approved and veterinarian-recommended antibiotic.

 

3. Just like in human medicine, zero antibiotic use is not an option. To go to zero, means to let animals suffer and die.
3. Just like in human medicine, zero antibiotic use is not an option. To go to zero, means to let animals suffer and die.

 

4. No antibiotics = no sustainability. Eliminating antibiotic use could increase global warming potential by 17.2 percent, energy use by 17.6 percent and water use by 13.2 percent per pound of pork produced.
4. No antibiotics = no sustainability. Eliminating antibiotic use could increase global warming potential by 17.2 percent, energy use by 17.6 percent and water use by 13.2 percent per pound of pork produced.

 

5. The consumer will pay. Eliminating antibiotics as a tool for farmers and veterinarians will increase animal sickness and mortality and thereby reduce pork supply. Less pork = more expensive pork.
5. The consumer will pay. Eliminating antibiotics as a tool for farmers and veterinarians will increase animal sickness and mortality and thereby reduce pork supply. Less pork = more expensive pork.